Recipes for a Fulfilling Summer

It’s been a while since my last blog post. As I have now begun the latter half of my last quarter at UCSB, I feel it’s time to get off my butt and do something about this heinous crime of neglect. I’ll admit, I have been having an absolutely terrific time at UCSB, and I have numerous mixed feelings about approaching the end of it.

I’m not sure I’m ready to write extensively on all of them (or any of them for that matter…). When I come to terms with it, I’ll be sure to relate them as well as I can. I think any of my readers who are from my home university, and are about to go on the year abroad as well; or are looking into education abroad in general from wherever, the end of your time abroad is an unavoidable prospect. An unpleasant, unavoidable prospect.

By no means should it hang over your head from the get-go, of course. Seizing the opportunities that arise, and creating opportunities for yourself, are far more important. This should not be forgotten when you embark upon a year abroad.

Instead, for the moment, I’d rather talk about how people generally understand that huge block of potential we call the Summer Holidays, back home in the UK. This is because it is something I am also contemplating at this time of the quarter. I don’t know how you all feel, but planning for Summer is a pain. There is always so much you could do, yet those holidays have a habit of just slipping right by you. It’s depressing, but I always feel I could make more of Summer.

Acknowledging that makes me want to rectify this situation for 2013. Therefore, here are two polar opposite ways of approaching the Summer holidays, in recipe form. There are many other recipes out there, and who knows, I may write others if these are successful. Both have their distinctive merits. However, it may well be the case that a fusion of the two would be highly satisfactory too. Bon appetit!

The Solidly Sensible Summer

Ingredients:

  • A hunk of work experience and/or an internship
  • Lashings of reliable income
  • Stacks of savings
  • A couple of CV-enriching strings to your bows

Preparation:

  • Begin seeking employment or other beneficial work experience early, and leave applications to mature very early on, well-ahead of Summer.

Directions:

  • Upon successfully garnering a relevant internship and/or employment, engage with said task enthusiastically and confidently, culminating in a rich, useful experience.
  • If possible, draw income from the sumptuous experience, and place said finances into a secure place, a bank perhaps.
  • Deftly draw the most beneficial of these experiences from the overall whole, and construct into CV-enriching points, ready to add to your future job applications at a later date.
  • Meanwhile, maintain the deposited funds as much as possible during the Summer. Ageing these will be of use to you in the future, when petrol costs keeps rising and you realise numerous other expenditures loom on the horizon: such as books for that final year of university, or your Xbox Live membership which needs renewing in September. Preparedness is next to awesomeness, don’t forget.

Cooking time:

Several hours per day. Generally, work experience and internships will weigh in heavily against your free time. For all of those early Friday mornings at the office, there’s a Student Night at Lola Lo’s on Thursday that may have to be foregone.

Entire cooking process may well take up the entire Summer.

Temperature:

Socially-speaking- Very low to Low at most times. However, bursts of high heat will be required to maintain your sanity, potentially.

Notes:

The dedication and commitment required for this Summer recipe are not inconsiderable. Please do not undertake lightly. However, the end product is a highly rewarding dish, and should not be dismissed lightly.

Credit: http://www.commercekitchen.com/

The Socially Sizzling Summer

Ingredients:

  • Dozens of social events
  • A pile of petrol receipts
  • Numerous nights of debauchery
  • A couple of festivals
  • A large amount of sand
  • A generous overdraft
  • Several television series to catch up on (NB: Brand or type is unimportant here, but this recipe would highly recommend Breaking Bad, The Wire, Homeland, or The Walking dead).
  • A handful of lazy days, filled with very little at all.

Preparation:

  • Before finishing your last term at university, ensure you have all the necessary people lined up to contact, as soon as that last exam finishes.
  • It may well be the case that this recipe will require a steady in-flow of cash to fund it. Select either enriched pre-existing savings, or a secure a summer job, to help fund your activities. When selecting the job, ideally it shall be flexible, well-paid, enjoyable, varied and require relatively few hours of work on weekends. IE no job that existed for a young student ever.

Directions:

  • This recipe can largely be improvised, and quantities of the ingredients are usually dependent on the personal preferences of the Chef. Personal discretion is recommended here. This recipe tends to require minimal direction, and can quite often snowball delightfully of it’s own accord. 
  • During the cooking process maintain an open mind and schedule. Unexpected developments or social opportunities may arise at any given time.

Cooking Time:

Between 2-5 days per week, depending on the number of servings required. Depending on the size of said dishes, individual cooking times may vary. Here is a list of suggested cooking times for individual dishes:

  1. “A quiet one down the pub”: 2-4 hours, depending on how long you have to wait for that-one-friend to buy the rounds, who reliably never does.
  2. “Beach trip”: 4-7 hours, depending on several variables such as:
    – Temperature
    – Presence of rain (always a factor in any recipe for Summer in Britain)
    – Sunbathing tolerance
    – Supply of beers
    – Did you remember the frisbee?
  3. “Mildly-Disastrous Camping Trip to Washed-Out British Seaside Town”: 3 days to a week.

Notes:

Do not neglect the Socially Sizzling Summer for too long at any one time. The Sizzle may well just… fizzle out. Input is required, and often you may need to seek outside input. Sous chefs and other friends should be wielded effectively to propagate a fertile environment for social events to proliferate.

While an enjoyable dish, the Socially Sizzling Summer may well be devoured very quickly. Moreover, negative repercussions of this dish have been know to include the following:

  • Significant debt
  • Hangovers
  • Sunburn
  • Lost possessions at festivals
  • Parental frustration
  • Loss of brain cells
  • Did I mention debt?

However, please bear in mind that this dish may well bear some delicious fruits as well, including:

  • Unforgettable experiences
  • Touching the hand of that singer as they jump down into the crowd in front of the main stage
  • Brilliantly perceptive and insightful conversations in takeaways at 4 am, which you may or may not be able to recapture
  • Rekindling your love for Pinkman
  • Enjoying a cold pint on a summer’s evening, next to the BBQ 

Credit: http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8155/7215313684_8608af2fc3_z.jpg

Finals in the US

Well this is the first of several, long-overdue posts about the end to my first term at UCSB. I figured that I should work chronologically, so here are some thoughts on the examination process this side of the Pond. I am actually writing this in Santa Barbara Airport- I arrived ridiculously early, and it’s strangely deserted. However, I have the view of the mountains to keep me company, so it’s not so unbearable.

For those of you who aren’t familiar with the system here, or haven’t read one of my posts before, the University of California Santa Barbara uses the Quarter System. There are three ten weeks terms, and you change classes for each. Therefore, all your studying, participation, midterms and finals all take place in this relatively short period of time. As a result, the quarters can go by very quickly, and I can personally testify to this. My first quarter has flown by.

However, I have to be brutally honest, the examination methods seem…. favourable for students? I’m not sure if that is an adequate description, but perhaps if I list some of the examination types I have either experienced or heard about, you might get my drift. For all the UK readers out there, keep in mind that this is like-for-like as a third year student..

  1. Multiple Choice:
    We have these in the UK, of course, but no-where near as frequently. Sometimes entire finals can be 50 multiple choice papers. I guess the downside to these questions is that I have heard they can have misleading answers to choose from, or they can be absurdly specific. If a lecturer mentioned what seemed like and aside during the quarter, these seemingly insignificant facts could well form a part of a multiple choice question. Nevertheless, most people I have spoken to have found these quite easy.
  2. Fill-in-the-blanks:
    60% of my American Literature mid-term AND finals were based on this. It required pure memorisation- authours, titles, and basic images or themes in poems or short novel extracts. 40% were essay questions, but even in the final, this consisted of two 1 page essay responses. I had three hours to complete this exam, I doubled the essay response required with 4 pages of essays (any less would have been ridiculous, take my word for it), I took my time and read the questions thoroughly etc, and I still finished in under half the allocated time. I haven’t been examined with such short essay responses expected since high school, and even some of those like my History GCSE were longer than this…
  3. “Take-Home Essays”:
    Now this really was alien. This was an assigned list of questions…. which you chose between… had to respond to from home…. by an assigned date… just like any other essay you might have for homework… except it has a “Take-Home” attached to the name… Why not just call it an essay? I had two classes that had no finals, but the major assessment method in each, as it were, consisted of two 12-15 page essays. That’s fine, I get it. I didn’t have a “Take-Home Essay”, but the only minute difference I can see is the time frame. These essays are set quite late in the quarter (compared to the major ones I had to do) so you have a smaller turnaround to complete them, but they do tend to be shorter: 5 or so pages. 5 pages double-spaced, I should add….
  4. Presentations:
    Ok, so this wasn’t an actual Final examination method for me, so to speak, but it formed part of an attempt to get “extra credit”. Personally, I haven’t really experienced opportunities for additional marks or credit in the UK, so I was interested to see how this system panned out in the States. In one of my classes, you could gain extra credit by reviewing the recent Lincoln movie… I didn’t take the Professor up on this, and elected for another option: presenting the thesis of my long essay. I was able to do this in two of my classes. I had to present my arguments/s, explain some of my sources, discuss any problems I was facing in writing it (the presentation came before the deadline, obviously) and invite any comments or questions from other members of the class. The idea was we could get some feedback and respond to this before the deadline, and in theory this was a great idea. However, when you have various members of the class, looking at wildly different topics, all at different stages of writing the writing process, the results could be mixed to say the least.

Overall, I have to admit that the experience of finals in the US tends to reinforce my conclusion on the general comparison between the education systems across the Pond. In the US, you have a larger, denser volume of work (comparatively, in the 10 week period), which you get through quicker, but it tends to be easier. In the UK, your assessments are less densely packed, but harder and generally longer in length (in terms of essays, exams, etc.) Moreover, the marking system is different: to attain top marks in the US, an A+, you have to be hitting 95%+ in the exams. To get a First in the UK, the percentage is technically lower, 70+ marks secured out of 100. Nonetheless, I feel that receiving a First in the UK is as hard as getting an A+ in the States, if not harder, because the expectations and requirements you have to meet to get a First are very high, even if you only get a red”70″ at the top of your paper, and not a “96”.

I am not necessarily passing judgement or drawing any conclusions on which system is “better” or “harder”… I’ll leave that up to you readers. However, I hope in reading this post, you can understand some of the differences, similarities and comparisons that I have experienced first-hand. If this helps you draw your own conclusions, or offers an interesting affirmation or contrast to your own experience, then all the better.

(Featured Image courtesy of http://www.socialstudent.co.uk/)

 

Football Observations

College work has been snowballing recently, and I haven’t had much opportunity to sit and write another blog post. However, with the work ethic at UCSB, you work hard in the week and party at the weekend, go hiking, socialise, go to the beach, whatever your imagination and funds permit really. Unfortunately, this isn’t entirely accurate at the moment. The prospects of entire days to just crack on with the history book I have to read, the first Spanish test I have to prepare for, or the first essay I have to write for my Public History class, on top of my required reading, are too sensible to avoid I’m afraid. People who just see UCSB as a party school couldn’t be more wrong. As much as people party hard here, they’ve also had to work hard and attain good results to get here. I’m glad to be at a college that has the best of both worlds. Nevertheless, I thought I’d take some time out from that and write about a matter very close to my heart. Football.

For any American readers, by this I refer to the sport where you actually use your feet more than once in every 10-15 plays. And no, I will NOT use the “S” word in this blog (except in the tags, reluctantly). Exponentially more offensive than his four-letter counterpart, I feel myself wince a little bit inside every time this small language barrier forces my hand and makes me use it.

I have been to two UCSB football games, played some “scrimmages” (kickabouts for English readers) and taken part in my first intramural game. Based on those, there are a few things I have noticed about the beautiful game stateside.

  1. I have been pleasantly surprised at the attendance for our first team UCSB football games. There must be a good few thousand fans at our home games. This is much higher attendance than the average university game back home. Admittedly, I am a firm believer in away fans demonstrating just how fervent fans are as well as home fans. Back home, it’s all well and good having a near 30,000 capacity, and not being able to sell all your tickets for away games *cough* West Brom *cough* However, I do not think there are as many opportunities or instances of a large contingent of UCSB students travelling away. I suppose this is to do with travelling all over the country/state when school is on. However, the attendance at UCSB home games is unavoidably admirable.
  2. Moreover, the fans are very fervent and have a charming tradition: throughout the match fans throw tortillas onto the pitch! This is because our mascot is a gaucho and logically food being thrown onto the pitch is the best way to celebrate a goal being scored… clearly. Either way, it’s very funny and gives the UCSB fans some character which I’m sure is quite memorable for visiting teams.

Tortillas on the pitch.

Our mascot, the UCSB Gaucho.

4. Now, as much as the team spirit is great here, the chants are abysmal. I have heard maybe 3/4 songs at the games. One of the most common has to be “OLE, ole, ole, ole…. GAUCHOS, GAUCHOS.” Simple but clear I suppose. More complicated, tuneful (relatively speaking, obviously, an English football crowd is never truly melodious) chants have yet to surface this side of the Pond.

5.  I have never seen any, but apparently at football games here, you have fans from opposing teams sitting together, with no separation whatsoever?!?! This would be suicidal back home. I find this quite hard to understand, but after speaking to other UCSB students, it quickly became clear that there aren’t such violent relationships between sports fans in the USA compared to England, particularly for football fans. English readers: can you imagine the Manchester United vs Manchester City / Liverpool vs Manchester United / Tottenham vs Arsenal  games with both sets of fans sitting together?! It would be an absolute bloodbath.

6.  The style of football here is quite different too. I would say, generally, there is a tendency for attacking players to try and walk the ball into the goal. They seem to be trying to score the goal of the season with every run. Which, as is to be expected with such individualistic style in an inherently team-based game, doesn’t often pan out. Quite often the vocal Canary fan inside me is screaming “PASS THE BLOODY BALL YOU MUPPET!” However, as I’m among the home fans and critical encouragement doesn’t seem as common among fans here, I have to swallow my words, wince, but keep my trap shut.

7. If there is a draw at the end of 90 minutes for the primary UCSB team, here they have an extra two halves of 10 minutes. This isn’t reserved for special situations, like in a European tournament or the World Cup-type event, this is just how everyday UCSB games work. I spoke to one UCSB fan near me at the first game, after expressing wonderment to Giles, and the American student told me that he felt that Americans don’t like tie games. If teams have played through 90 minutes, and you still don’t know who is the better team, they would rather continuing play until you can eventually establish the victor. I had to smirk to myself, as the rules seem to have been changed, purely because some Americans can’t deal with a game where there are no winners or losers. Talk about American Exceptionalism!

8. Finally, fans over here take a much more relaxed approach to viewing the beautiful game. People will wander in and out throughout the game, some staying for the entirety, others catching just one half, others arriving 20/40/60 minutes into the game. My personal opinion would be that if you’re there to support your team, and support them properly, you need to be there for the full entirety of the game, through thick and thin. None of this, “Oh we’re 3-1 down at 79 minutes, we might as well head to the car to get a head start on the other fans leaving the game.”

In summary, I am enjoying the football scene over here. However, I have to keep checking myself, and reminding myself that I have been an avid football fan and season ticket holder for going on 14 years now. What I’m used to is very different from the reality over here. Moreover, England is one of the true homes of the beautiful game, with a rich culture of football. It’s very hard to beat, and unfortunately America just isn’t a superpower in this instance. Nevertheless, it is interesting to visit another country where football is a minor sport when compared to baseball, basketball, hockey and, of course, AMERICAN Football. Still, I am pleased that there is at least some football culture here, and not a bad one at that.